Browsing Articles Written by

George Kalmpourtzis

Non classé

Game design & Creativity

9 mars 2016 • By
George Land and Beth Jarman in their book Breakpoint and Beyond: Mastering the Future Today, present their famous experiment with the paper clip. The researchers wanted to examine the resourcefulness of the over a thousand students during their life in a school environment. In order to do so, they performed the same test to the same students when they were five, ten and fifteen years old. Students that would surpass an amount of possible answers to the paperclip question were considered “divergent thinking geniuses”. After analyzing the results of the tests, the researchers found that 98% of five-year-old students that took the test were classified as geniuses. It turns out that the same students while growing, performed worse and worse on the test, since only 30% were classified as geniuses when they were ten, while when being fifteen, only the 12% of them could propose a sufficient number of answers.

Creativity can be both learned and unlearned!

Games are a great tool for developing someone’s creative skills. From one side, games offer diverse perspectives on a variety of issues, helping players have a holistic or different than normal perspective on things and on the other hand students can work on game design, a multi-disciplinary and cognitively challenging procedure.
Game design consists of various components, each of which comes with its own particular challenges and learning benefits. This process includes the use problem solving, problem posing, artistic, expression, technology, narrative skills, while helping potential game designers have a better understanding of the world around them.
Which are the tools that could foster creativity during game design process?
Following are just some proposals:

  • The suspension of premature judgement and the lack of filtering of ideas.Create analogies and metaphors, through symbols, etc., by finding similarities between the situation, which we wish to understand and another situation, which we already understand.
  • Build imaginative and ideal situations (invent the ideal vision).
  • Find ways to make the ideal vision happen.
  • Relate things or ideas which were previously unrelated.
  • Generate multiple solutions to a problem.

The potential of game design as a tool for learning is great. Whether creating physical or digital games, different challenges arise that help designers evolve and develop their problem solving skills, flexibility to different situations and proposal of novel solutions. This is just the beginning!

Source : georgekalmpourtzis.com


Non classé

How games can support learning experiences

9 novembre 2015 • By

The continuous development of technological advances and their introduction to the daily life of students and parents raises the question of technology’s impact in educational systems more now than ever. Video games, as a part of technology revolution, are also part of students’ daily life. Because of this, during the previous decade there has been an increased academic interest in the field of educational games.

How games can support learning experiences

Video games, being a new tool in the educational process have been viewed both with skepticism and enthusiasm. There are teachers and parents that view video games as shallow commercial products that are linked to violence and have no educational value. On the other hand, there are teachers and parents that view video games as a new potential pedagogical tool that could be introduced in classrooms in a variety of ways helping students develop competences important for the 21st century.

Things will be much easier when people understand that video games are not different from any other game, like hide and seek or chess. The basic elements and principles of these games are the same, while the main element that changes is the means that they are implemented and presented. The role of play in classroom has been recognized as very important since the ancient years and almost all pedagogic theories support this notion.

Read full article: here

By George Kalmpourtzis – Lead Educational Games Designer


Non classé

Augmented reality for the development of spatial thinking

4 novembre 2015 • By

Find the Jackalop is a treasure hunt game, using the latest technological advancements in order to create an intrinsically learning experience. The game is based on the principle of teaching spatial thinking concepts, emphasizing in mental representations, transformations, reference systems and giving and receiving spatial related information as well as working with maps. The game requires the existence of two types of teams, each of which develops different spatial thinking skills: The one type is working on reading and finding meaning on the map symbolization, as well as offering directions (Operations team). The other type is working on receiving directions and translating them correctly in order to find the correct path (Adventure team). Both teams need to exchange information in order to achieve their common goal. Participation in one type of team improves different spatial thinking skills. Playing both roles in the game is required in order to develop the whole skillset of the activity. The game is suggested to be played in an area which is familiar to kids, since this helps them find connections between the map and the real world.

Augmented reality for the development of spatial thinking

The game’s main objective is to find a mythical creature, called the Jackalop. The game requires the collaboration of various student teams, who need to find the footprints of the Jackalop in an area around the school. Each footprint (which is represented by a 3D printed item depicting a footprint or a paper printed version of the footprint) is accompanied with a secret password. When the password is used, a new position is unlocked on thes map. At the end of the race, the students will be able to find the Jackalop. In the game there are two types of teams (Operations and Adventure teams), both of which have different capabilities and need to exchange information in order to find the footprints leading to the Jackalope.

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Généralités

Education : la réalité augmentée pour apprendre à se localiser

4 novembre 2015 • By

A la recherche du Jackalop est un jeu de chasse au trésor, utilisant les dernières avancées technologiques pour créer une expérience d’apprentissage intrinsèque. Ce jeu est basé sur les concepts de la représentation dans l’espace, en instant sur la représentation mentale, les transformations, les systèmes de référence, la réception d’informations de localisation, et l’utilisation de plans.

L’objectif du jeu est de retrouver une créature légendaire, le Jackalop, à partir de traces laissées sur la zone de jeu. La zone de jeu est généralement une zone familière pour les élèves, de manière à les aider à créer plus facilement des liens entre le plan et le monde réel. Ex : Un parc ou les rues autour de l’école.

Pour participer, les élèves sont répartis en équipes. Chaque équipe peut avoir l’un des 2 rôles suivants :

  • les aventuriers : leur mission est de retrouver les traces laissées par le Jackalop dans la zone de jeu. Les aventuriers sont équipés de tablettes numériques géolocalisées, qui leur permettent de communiquer avec le centre de commandement
  • le centre de commandement : leur mission consiste à élaborer une stratégie puis guider les aventuriers vers les traces du Jackalop. Les équipiers du centre de commandement sont dans l’école, et dans le cas présenté dans la vidéo, sont munis d’une table taclile ou d’un tableau blanc interactif sur lesquels ils disposent du plan de la zone de jeu, sur laquelle apparaissent les traces de la créature, et la position des aventuriers en temps réel. Ils peuvent contacter les aventuriers pour leur transmettre des consignes.

Les traces du Jackalop sont matérialisées par une empreinte imprimée en 3D, sur laquelle est indiqué une très courte séquence ADN représentant un mot de passe. Une fois que ce mot de passe est transmis au centre de commandement, de nouvelles traces apparaissent sur le plan. Lorsque toutes les traces ont été collectées, les équipes se réunissent pour débriefer, et échanger les rôles.

 

 

Source : A la recherche du Jackalop – Se localiser dans l’espace en utilisant la réalité augmentée


Non classé

The video game educational revolution

2 novembre 2015 • By

During the previous years, video games were designed for a very specific part of the global population. The great advances in technology during the previous decade, the development of the internet, social networks, smartphones and tablets lead to an even greater development in casual gaming. Video games did grow in order to include different target groups. Video games like Wii Fit, Kinectimals or PiBot: Math & Action are not designed for hardcore gamers. This development of video games had a positive impact on educational video game design, since a bigger set of resources was invested by industries and public institutions.

The way video games do evolve changes the habits of potential gamers. According to a 2013 report of Casual Connect 75% of gamers, who are also parents, engage in video gaming activities with their kids, especially on consoles. In 2013, active players were estimated to be around 207 million. This makes video games a great means of communication and a great tool for educational purposes.

Video games can motivate students to learn

Video games are a very interesting educational tool, for both the industry and academia, because they create intrinsically motivating experiences and increase motivation for learning. Video games support active learning and can be used as tools for motivating students to work on specific learning fields. Through a gamified environment, students can spend more time on learning activities, which could be related to the teaching of mathematics, physics, languages etc. Besides this, the use of innovative interfaces and controls, like Microsoft Kinect and Wii Remote could support the existence of educational environments that combine physical exercise with learning tools (exergames).

Read full article: here

By George Kalmpourtzis – Lead Educational Games Designer